ProductCreationGurus

Product Creation Gurus

Tiny Home

How Temporary Tiny Homes Could Solve Dutch Cities’ Housing Crises

A temporary housing prototype

There’s a distinctive twist in Rotterdam’s latest push to build more public housing: most of the units constructed shouldn’t be around for very long.

The Netherlands’ second largest city is going big on temporary homes with a new promise to start construction and installation of up to 3,000 mobile housing units. They’re designed to help manage emergency needs while the city continues to build more permanent public housing.

The idea of shoving low income residents into makeshift homes built to last no more than a decade or so might sound dystopian, but Rotterdam is merely following a national trend. As the country struggles to keep up with the pace of delivery it needs for new housing, many cities have sprouted temporary micro-neighborhoods of mobile prefabricated housing, normally located on brownfield sites that are often vacant and on the far edges of city limits.

To meet demand, the Netherlands will need to construct an estimated extra one million homes by 2030. Dutch cities are trying to ease matters by reducing the size requirements for future public housing units and trying to flush unused units onto the market.

Currently, they’re still 200,000 units short of their target for rental housing. While the country waits for these units to be completed, their future tenants need somewhere to live.

The short-term solution being adopted is constructing what are referred to locally (somewhat exaggeratedly) as “tiny houses.”  These prefabricated units, normally designed for single or two person occupancy, are cheap to construct and install, and can be located on sites that haven’t yet been prepared for heavier construction or which are available only for short-term use. They’ve achieve

[“source=cnbc”]